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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
lead shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in a stormy chicago, shriver's name and came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on the flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family still grieving from the recent death of robert raised an objective in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success and repairing the alliance with france weekend by a disagreement about the vietnam war had prompted president nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when the democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimination designated sargent shriver as his choice for vice president. the election was a disaster from the governing shriver who only one massachusetts and the district of columbia. but perhaps the final word came 18 months leader as the watergate scandal unfolded in the bumper stickers appeared today to read an ou
. >> juliet: president obama continues to push for tax hikes on the rich. and france lost a bid to raise taxes and he want today raise to 75%. now, there weren't a lot of people he was focused on, really not that much money, he was going to raise, but the fact is he wanted the french judicial council, however, said it would have been excessive and unconstitutional. joining us-- >> sorry, dave. >> dave: and for tax foundation from the heritage foundation. >> juliet: good morning, curtis. >> good morning. >> dave: what's the deal here, the decision made is not unconstitutional, but bottom line, bad for the economy? i think we can learn from this? >> that's right, the court has bailed them out. and the tax increase, 75% rate was going to really damage the french economy. the french economy's already strugglingling and adding on the economy would be worse. >> i'm looking at it, expected to be a temporary two year measure and affect 1500 people and raise less than 661 million dollars. >> but the revenue we brought in, and what it would have done, it would have reduced the incentives, and working an
capacity by 11% since 2005. mary frances fagan works for american airlines, which canceled 377 flights on thursday. >> to the degree we have the capability of adding flights to very popular destinations we do that, and i'm sure other carriers that have that capability do as well. >> reporter: but not everyone is going to one of those very popular destinations, scott. and for those who are not, the message from the airlines is "patience, please." >> pelley: dean, thanks very much. we found another sign that the economy is recovering and we'll tell you about it next. tell you about it next. i have what science calls the nightly stuffy nose thing. i can't breathe, so i can't sleep. and the next day i pay for it. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. [ female announcer ] exercise your right to breathe right. get two free strips at breatheright.com. hey it's your right to breathe right. get two free strip
burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the
to try to get wallace off the ticket. it was run by two people, the national chair that france and laws machine that got true many elected in 1940 and ended pauli was a california millionaire that said i went into politics and realized it was cheap to elect a new congress than to buy at the old way and he is going to get indicted for treason. >> so, they decide they're going to try to resolve delete user count him to convince him that he can't get free elective wallace is on the tickets. we are not denying that. in 1941 when henry made his famous speech saying the 20th century is to be the american sentry and the united states is and to dominate the world economically and politically and militarily and culturally. he responded to that as vice president and me the speech. they had the people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and russian revolution he called for ending colonialism and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokes
in the world. france, 2.08. the u.s., 2.06, ireland, 2.01. in red, they're looking at next generations that will get smaller and smaller and smaller. the uk, well under 2. china, 1.55. we know they've actually implemented policies because they want to control population. in the bigger picture, fooling around with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal clif
britain germany and france has moved from the country side to the cities two, hundred million people. and they don't have the same status as those who live there of initially, officially, you have an urban middle class 300 million people and growing .. this is a society that has got a lot of pushes and pulls going on, and my worry is that if they find it difficult to manage that, they resort to nationalism, you have seen a little bit of that toward japan, and the problem is, that that wells up from the people. that is not the government and the government has tried to use some of these demonstrations to sort of make a point about japan, and they nearly lost control on a couple of occasions, so i -- i think that -- i don't think of china as an enemy, it is a competitor. it is a partner in many ways. but we also have to work with the chinese in terms of how do we -- how do we persuade them to become a responsible steak holder? .. and sort of abide by the rules? china's rise is not necessarily disadvantages you to the united states. >> rose: it is not a zero sum a game? >> no, i don't
that slavery was less expensive than these new forms? brazil, u.s., britain, france, spain. >> a very interesting question. i think my first response would be to say i'm not sure so much that all forms of slavery disappeared as so much evolved in transition. obviously, there were laws passed that made a certain thing illegal. from a paper law stand point certain things disappeared. but the case of bonded labor it showed that things did not disappear but adapt to a different set of laws and climate. then evolved around those hurdles to continue to effect the same kind of mode of exi ployation. as to whether f there was a point in the past where producers were faced with a scenario where one set of nonslave-like labor bake more economic efficient there are certainly few instances. i think the historians here would probably have those more in their head than i do. particularly in case where is laws with penalties were perceived to be enforced. then the perception is that form of exploitation is no longer beneficial. we either have to evade it and try to do something similar or adopt for
was discouraging because i really wanted to be him and write about boxing and food and france and new york lowlife but i don't know anything about any of those things. >> rose:. >> it was his abilities as a stylist that attracted you or a storyteller? >> he was a great stylist, really, i mean, he was his own story. and it was really all about him, i think, but he was a beautiful stylist, and when i was at the magazine, they used to i had lunch once with william sean and he said it was true that aj liebling sat in his office at the new yorker and pounding the keys and he was chart chortling at his own work. >> the only person in the history of the magazine to enjoy writing. everybody else suffered through it. >> rose: a moment of great pleasure to writ write write for new yorker magazine? >> it was a lot of fun. i liked writing faulk of the town when it was anonymous, and. >> rose: yeah. >> and it was just that anonymous, curious reporter, wandering around the city and seeing whatever you saw. but it was like a little weekly newspaper to me and i enjoyed it a lot,. >> rose: you can always do that,
like syria, egypt, britain, france, you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just, we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even, just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers, primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't d
like syria egypt, britain, france you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't destroy them t
on what doom sayers camped out at this mountain in france are doing today. they have been there for days believing that when the end of the world came a ufo would come to the mountain and rescue them. >>> got milk? you could be in for a major shock. mandy is here with what's moving your money. prices, i saw this headline and couldn't believe it. 6 to $8 a gallon? >> it is unbelievable. that is if congress does not pass a new farm bill, chris, that amends farm policy that dates back to the truman presidency. obviously this has been kind of lost in that brouhaha of what's going on between the obama administration and republicans over the fiscal cliff and the budget wranglings, and there is believe it or not an impasse over a farm bill that covers billions in agricultural programs and without last minute action they would have to follow a 1949 farm law that would force washington to buy milk at wildly inflated prices which therefore means we would have to pay the wildly inflated prices as well when we go to buy milk at the supermarket. now it costs an average around 3.65 a gallon. if we go
five, france. taxes are an issue there. i think the election of francois alaund and his rate on the top end as well as some of the other things he's doing in france, lowering the retirement age, this is sort of a litmus test in some ways and it's important. maybe richard can tell me i need to learn more about the british tax code. icons on the edge. a number of names you know at home, jcpenney, best buy stock has been hammered, the maker of the blackberry, once iconic, now struggling. >> they're gone. >> they're not gone. >> last one. congratulations. >> they're struggling, and i think it's the end of an era for some companies. the $25 billion bank settlement, a huge deal. some people said it was not enough. whatever your thoughts are, it was a big story. facebook, you remember them? they have come back in the last six weeks. everyone thought this was an ipo that was going to soar. >> who manages that company? >> mark zuckerberg. that guy right there. >> poorly, i would submit. >> he built it, so who are we to judge, right? maybe the public company is a different story, but that ipo flo
and i had a chance to spend a little time on one of those trips and she went to france, egypt and tunisia. and i accompanied her on the plane and watched what was going on. she was non-stop. she took that kind of aggressive, non-stop travel to a certain degree from her husband the former president bill clinton. i traveled with him all of the time and he was non-stop, as well. we used to do day trips to bosnia or kosovo or whatever, and hillary clinton was like that. she moved, she moved, she moved, and i suspect we'll see that from john kerry and he knows he has four years to do what he needs to do and he'll try to milk as much of that as he possibly can. there are so many international issues out there on the agenda. i was surprised, i have to say. i thought he would speak after the president nominated him and say a few words and for some reason they decided he would not speak at the roosevelt room. normally they do that, but for whatever reason he didn't. he likes to talk, we know that. >> he does like to talk, and we know as well, secretary clinton when she was the first la
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courag
to do that? do we need to go to coalition partners britain and france? where is the potential for mission creep and escalation? which is exactly what we house -- what we saw happen in somalia and it dovetailed off over mogadishu. and i do not think you mentioned to the warlords, did you? gregg's warlords are not here. of taking care of these problems. >> that is foreign internal defense. >> right now we have three personnel who are part of the monusco mission. when we had the training effort underway for the 391st, it was about 60 folks. there are now out. it is a limited footprint. about 17,000 u.n. troops in the congo. >> all of these different non state, non uniform belligerents coming together against our efforts, is there a potential there? >> no. i would like to underscore what has been said. we're not talking about american soldiers on the ground, engaged against rebel groups in the drc. that is not something that is in our game plan or in our thinking. what we need to focus on -- >> train and enable? >> to train and unable, build capacity. >> build capacity, an able an
he used performance-enhancing drugs. when that ban was imposed, armstrong's seven tour de france victories were erased. armstrong has signaled that he has no intention of 'peeling the ban before today's deadline. >> and some of the french folks armstrong may have rode past are breaking a holiday season taboo and selling their unwanted presents. >> they might be on to something there. that's exactly what they were doing at this store in paris yesterday. patrons saying it's better than regifting. and during tough economic times, they've got a point, any bit of money really counts. >> and 52% of french people are planning to make money from their gifts. and maybe the other 48% are lying about it. here's the deal. you all know you've gotten a bad christmas present before. i have family members, you will remain nameless because we're on national television right now, and you're like, what am i supposed to do with this? and if you could make some money off of it, i would think they would be happy for you if you could make money off of it. instead of just throwing it out. >> regifting i
want to bring you the dumb criminal of the year award. this is a thief in france. stole christmas presents from a car. he left his phone in that car. he wanted his phone back, so he went to the police to report a missing phone. guess who was at the station? the people he just stole from, saying hey, this guy left his phone in the car. that is careless criminal of the day. >>> and then this. you want the hangover cure. drumroll. it's asparagus. according to the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract many -- it helps your liver cells and it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ pledge your love with techs and tweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ even if you're not a hunk you can always text your junk ♪ ♪ that's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪
airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courage to try something really hard, and that is why they did the accomplishment. my first b
in addition to support other contributing countries. european union, france, others have all already begun to reengage with maliian armed forces. it's not as if there is absent support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have i learned if i might, both ms. dory and mr. gast. we were actively engaged, the usaid mission celebrated a 50th anniversary, we were very involved in trying to sustain a culture democracy. whatlesssons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures, ignored domestic issues, our rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn from that? >> thank you, senator. excellent question. i would say in the best of times, mali is in a -- is a country in crisis. when one looks at a human development index, they rank in the bottom dozen. that's -- as assistant secretary carson mentioned, 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in need of services. and so it is unfortunate that the government hasn't
in france the cac is off by 14 points. in asia overnight, we did see marketed markets. hang seng was down .4%. shanghai composite was up by about 4.5%. oil prices have been off by about 22 cents the last time we checked. right now down by six cents to $86.67. the ten-year note at this hour is yielding 1.723%. wow. yields come back up. i was out for about three days last week and yields have come back a little bit. dollar at this point is stronger against the euro. the euro is at 1.3159. we have seen the euro gaining ground. gold prices have been down slightly. down by 1,692. it's interesting to come back after three days and see it. >> it's telling the move would bring that reaction. >> it is. because it was stuck for so long. i haven't seen a 1.7 -- >> it went 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 7 -- >> i haven't seen 1.7 in weeks and weeks. >> i was saying it's telling about how incredibly dead and -- telling about the ten-year, how boring and how narrow the range has been. like when greenspan said, i need to see that. he hasn't needed to see it for a while. >> i don't think it is his favorite any more. >> it'
of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today.
enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. when hawaii became a state on august 21st, 1959, daniel inouye ran for the united states house of representatives as the new state's first congressman. leaders elected to the united states senate in 1962, he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states senate. an hour earlier interviews in a series, other people we've spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. and in 1959 you became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you were first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> well, i've spent some time in washington before this. as you know, i went to law school, but i have never been on the floor
the gulf home. >> juliet: 8:43 east coast times. major blow to france's socialist president. panel has just thrown out and plan to tax the wealthy at 75% rate. ruled it as excessive and unconstitutional. if you like it, then you should put a super bowl rick on -- ring on it ♪ if you like it then you should have put a ring on it >> juliet: i love that video. pepsi announces plans to allow fans to join bon is i on the football field. dave, i see that you are all over that. >> dave: i will be there. so who knows. new insight into the short yet fascinating life of hollywood starlet marilyn monroe. newly unclassified fbi documents reveal how closely she was being monitored for alleged ties to underground communist party. aneed that vogel has more. >> new information from the fbi shows just how interested the agency was in finding out whether actress marilyn monroe had ties to the communist party. the files show the fbi had been tracking her for years. who she was friends with and if they had ties to communist in this record from 1956, agents had documented anonymous phone call from the "new yo
in bad shape. my husband was a soldier in war war ii, and he was wounded in normandy, france. he fought for his country. he paid into social 30 security. he worked until he was 70. host: at me ask you what do you think should happen and what do you think is gonna happen? caller: part of my little social security check is because of his, and without it i would be out on the street. we were just poor people always. i am wondering are they going to take away our social security checks? host: i understand your concern about the social security check. las vegas, nev., what do you think about that? caller: 84 allowing me to speak. i agree with the previous callers, but let me just say that this country -- i am 69 years old -- 30 years ago this country was balanced. social security was balanced, and all the other balance sheets were balanced. until these republicans started dipping. they borrowed from social security and never paid it back, and then they started saying the problem was with social security. they cut programs, and i just think that they need to really look at what they have done
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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